2021 Global Food Policy Report

Agriculture, Policies

2021 Global Food Policy Report

Lessons from COVID crisis for reducing inequities and enhancing resilience of food systems

The severe health and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have disrupted food systems and upended livelihoods. Yet pandemic responses have demonstrated the power of well-crafted policies to blunt the impact of major shocks while laying the groundwork for stronger, more resilient food systems, according to the 2021 Global Food Policy Report, released today by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). The report provides lessons drawn from the current crisis that can help us transform food systems to reduce the impact of the ongoing pandemic, better prepare for future shocks, and address longstanding weaknesses and inequalities.

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Read: “The Lie of Global Prosperity” as a work of popular education (Science & Society)

Poverty, Threats

Read: “The Lie of Global Prosperity” as a work of popular education (Science & Society)

“This slim volume aims to pierce the veil of neoliberal triumphalism about self-declared progress over global poverty and inequality. As an introduction to these issues, the book succeeds quite well. The author’s intention is to synthesize the work of researchers from different fields into a work of ‘popular education’ directed to ‘revolutionary activists and participants in social movements’. Despite the author’s modesty, it should be noted that his activist work in Haiti lends the book a personal weight that, while not front and center, credits it with an earnestness it would otherwise lack.

The Lie of Global Prosperity is divided into two parts. The first part, the more central of the two, exposes serious problems in the methodology and measurement of global poverty used by global economic institutions, such as the World Bank.

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Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare

Other Atrocities, Threats

Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare

Artificial intelligence is changing the world we live in. It will redefine the workplace and have significant implications for everything we do, probably by the end of this decade. Some AI applications are already a part of our everyday lives, such as intelligent car navigation systems.

So, what is artificial intelligence? AI can be defined as ‘the ability of machines to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence’. AI has in fact been around for several decades. The IBM chess-playing computer called ‘Deep Blue’ defeated world chess champion Garry Kasparov as far back as 1997. But the development of AI has been accelerating rapidly in recent years with a substantial increase in the number of real-world applications where AI is now practical.

According to the US Department of Defense’s Joint Artificial Intelligence Center, the reasons for this are more massive datasets, increased computing power, improved machine-learning algorithms, and greater access to open-source code libraries.

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What’s in it for us: added value-based approach towards telehealth

Health, Policies

What’s in it for us: added value-based approach towards telehealth

After interviewing various stakeholders from public and private healthcare systems (in Lithuania and the US), researchers Dr Agne Gadeikiene, Prof Asta Pundziene, Dr Aiste Dovaliene from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania designed a detailed structure revealing added value of remote healthcare services, i.e. telehealth. Adopting the concept of value co-creation common in business research to healthcare, the scientists claim that this is the first comprehensive analysis of this kind in the healthcare field involving two different healthcare systems.

According to the researchers, although in the US the consultations via phone with physician have been available for more than fifty years, the technological development of recent years has radically changed the concept of telehealth.

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The Institutions Americans No Longer Believe In

Economy, Policies

The Institutions Americans No Longer Believe In

A major business leader is bullish about the American economy in the short term, but he has big concerns about the future of the country.

Jamie Dimon, the C.E.O. of the investment banking behemoth J. P. Morgan Chase, has issued a long letter to stockholders that has gotten considerable attention outside the business world.

He is extremely confident that the post-COVID economy will grow dramatically.  How could it not, what “with excess savings, new stimulus savings, huge deficit spending, more QE [quantitative easing], a new potential infrastructure bill, a successful vaccine and euphoria around the end of the pandemic.”  He thinks the good times will last into 2023.  But he warns against letting the coming success blind us to our nation’s underlying problems.  “”Unfortunately, the tragedies of this past year are only the tip of the iceberg — they merely expose enormous failures that have existed for decades and have been deeply damaging to America.”’

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Easy Pandemic Career and Economic Survival Tools for High School Teachers

Education, Policies

Easy Pandemic Career and Economic Survival Tools for High School Teachers

Teachers worldwide need to help prepare teens for certain economic shifts that have already started to occur as a result of the pandemic. Most of these lessons are learned in college. However, more and more student have either postponed or dropped out of college altogether due to economic uncertainties brought on by the coronavirus pandemic.

SoRichIam Media is not new to preparing high school teens for the real world. The boutique media company CEO, LeTicia Lee, is a former Wall Street Language Executive Instructor. Her job was to help foreign executives of Fortune 500 Companies make quality shifts within the company during times of economic uncertainty. So who better to help teens and teachers during a pandemic than she? Her “Dynamic Duo Package” designed for high school students does just that.

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The rise of domestic terrorism is fueled mostly by far-right extremists, analysis shows

Terrorism, Threats

The rise of domestic terrorism is fueled mostly by far-right extremists, analysis shows

Domestic terrorism incidents have soared to new highs in the United States, driven chiefly by white-supremacist, anti-Muslim and anti-government extremists, the study shows.

Domestic terrorism incidents have soared to new highs in the United States, driven chiefly by white-supremacist, anti-Muslim and antigovernment extremists on the far right, according to a Washington Post analysis of data compiled by the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

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This crisis is different’: the dramatic rebound in the global economy

Economy, Policies

This crisis is different’: the dramatic rebound in the global economy

From an economic point of view, it is almost as if the last year was just a bad dream.

As recently as October, the IMF was warning that coronavirus will cause “lasting damage” to living standards across the world with any recovery likely to be “long, uneven and uncertain”.

Yet the forecast it released this week is very different. By 2024, the IMF now believes, the US economy is likely to be stronger than it had predicted before the pandemic. For most advanced economies, it says, there will be only limited scars from the crisis.

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How can science diplomacy end the biological disaster?

Diplomacy, Policies

How can science diplomacy end the biological disaster?

THE Covid-19 pandemic, a biological disaster that has created social and economic devastation, needs to be addressed through the creation of a “science diplomacy road map,” which will define and implement innovative ways to reduce cataclysmic occurrences.

There are two dimensions of science diplomacy that have to be taken into consideration in order to address effectiveness, accountability, integrity, transparency, competence and inclusiveness: a) the implementation of a science-based risk-informed governance; and b) the integration of resilient and sustainable elucidations.

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How bad is prison health care in the Unites States

Health, Policies

How bad is prison health care in the Unites States

Prisons have continued to be the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic — the largest single-site cluster outbreaks have been in carceral settings. At the outset of the pandemic, reports of poor testing and lack of appropriate personal protective equipment in prisons abounded, turning much needed attention to the quality of health care in correctional facilities far and wide.

But this is an old problem, says Adnan Khan. He spent 16 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. In 2019, he was resentenced under a California Senate bill that set the path for his eventual release. Now, he runs Re:Store Justice, an advocacy organization he founded while behind bars that works to end extreme sentencing.

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