The Institutions Americans No Longer Believe In

Economy, Policies

The Institutions Americans No Longer Believe In

A major business leader is bullish about the American economy in the short term, but he has big concerns about the future of the country.

Jamie Dimon, the C.E.O. of the investment banking behemoth J. P. Morgan Chase, has issued a long letter to stockholders that has gotten considerable attention outside the business world.

He is extremely confident that the post-COVID economy will grow dramatically.  How could it not, what “with excess savings, new stimulus savings, huge deficit spending, more QE [quantitative easing], a new potential infrastructure bill, a successful vaccine and euphoria around the end of the pandemic.”  He thinks the good times will last into 2023.  But he warns against letting the coming success blind us to our nation’s underlying problems.  “”Unfortunately, the tragedies of this past year are only the tip of the iceberg — they merely expose enormous failures that have existed for decades and have been deeply damaging to America.”’

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Easy Pandemic Career and Economic Survival Tools for High School Teachers

Education, Policies

Easy Pandemic Career and Economic Survival Tools for High School Teachers

Teachers worldwide need to help prepare teens for certain economic shifts that have already started to occur as a result of the pandemic. Most of these lessons are learned in college. However, more and more student have either postponed or dropped out of college altogether due to economic uncertainties brought on by the coronavirus pandemic.

SoRichIam Media is not new to preparing high school teens for the real world. The boutique media company CEO, LeTicia Lee, is a former Wall Street Language Executive Instructor. Her job was to help foreign executives of Fortune 500 Companies make quality shifts within the company during times of economic uncertainty. So who better to help teens and teachers during a pandemic than she? Her “Dynamic Duo Package” designed for high school students does just that.

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This crisis is different’: the dramatic rebound in the global economy

Economy, Policies

This crisis is different’: the dramatic rebound in the global economy

From an economic point of view, it is almost as if the last year was just a bad dream.

As recently as October, the IMF was warning that coronavirus will cause “lasting damage” to living standards across the world with any recovery likely to be “long, uneven and uncertain”.

Yet the forecast it released this week is very different. By 2024, the IMF now believes, the US economy is likely to be stronger than it had predicted before the pandemic. For most advanced economies, it says, there will be only limited scars from the crisis.

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How can science diplomacy end the biological disaster?

Diplomacy, Policies

How can science diplomacy end the biological disaster?

THE Covid-19 pandemic, a biological disaster that has created social and economic devastation, needs to be addressed through the creation of a “science diplomacy road map,” which will define and implement innovative ways to reduce cataclysmic occurrences.

There are two dimensions of science diplomacy that have to be taken into consideration in order to address effectiveness, accountability, integrity, transparency, competence and inclusiveness: a) the implementation of a science-based risk-informed governance; and b) the integration of resilient and sustainable elucidations.

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How bad is prison health care in the Unites States

Health, Policies

How bad is prison health care in the Unites States

Prisons have continued to be the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic — the largest single-site cluster outbreaks have been in carceral settings. At the outset of the pandemic, reports of poor testing and lack of appropriate personal protective equipment in prisons abounded, turning much needed attention to the quality of health care in correctional facilities far and wide.

But this is an old problem, says Adnan Khan. He spent 16 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. In 2019, he was resentenced under a California Senate bill that set the path for his eventual release. Now, he runs Re:Store Justice, an advocacy organization he founded while behind bars that works to end extreme sentencing.

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The Future of Ecommerce: 5 Trends Sellers Need to Know

Economy, Policies

The Future of Ecommerce: 5 Trends Sellers Need to Know

This year, the rules of e-commerce have effectively been rewritten. In an increasingly touchless society, our lives have become digitised, changing how we engage, interact, and view day-to-day life. Now, new online buying behaviours have emerged, and millions of consumers that previously relied on brick-and-mortar sales are shopping online to meet everyday needs.

But the rise of e-commerce hasn’t been without shortcomings. At the height of the pandemic in May, sellers, welcoming millions of new consumers, were faced with supply chain disruption, shock shortages, and business loss. Many turned to international options to mitigate issues, and cross-border sales saw a staggering 21 per cent increase in year-on-year sales in June.

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Beyond Pandemic’s Upheaval, a Racial Wealth Gap Endures

Economy, Policies

Beyond Pandemic’s Upheaval, a Racial Wealth Gap Endures

Billions in aid has been dispensed, and the social safety net has been reinforced. Will there be more ambitious steps to address longtime inequities?

Not since Lyndon Baines Johnson’s momentous civil rights and anti-poverty legislation has an American president so pointedly put racial and economic equity at the center of his agenda.

President Biden’s multitrillion-dollar initiatives to rebuild infrastructure in neglected and segregated neighborhoods, increase wages for health care workers, expand the safety net and make pre-K and college more accessible are all shot through with attention to the particular economic disadvantages that face racial minorities. So were his sweeping pandemic relief bill and Inauguration Day executive orders.

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The Politics of Post-Pandemic Education

Education, Policies

The Politics of Post-Pandemic Education

Spring break usually means a giddy escape from the classroom for children across America. This year, however, the millions of students who have not set foot in a classroom since last spring are celebrating by closing their laptops for a few days. Many of these students have no prospect of returning to class anytime soon — and their pandemic-shuttered schools have become the focus of an ugly battle among teachers’ unions, school boards, parents, and elected officials about how, and when, they should reopen.

As the politics of reopening have grown increasingly antagonistic and personal,[1] the pandemic is blurring partisan and racial cleavages around public education and creating new coalitions that could remain powerful players in local education politics. At stake is the fate of our public education system itself.

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Diplomacy starts with domestic housing

Diplomacy, Policies

Diplomacy starts with domestic housing

If the United States is serious about leading with diplomacy, strengthening the State Department and diplomatic corps, and ensuring that the face of our nation abroad is more representative of our melting pot at home, it will require eliminating the disincentives to long-term training and to serving domestically for our nation’s diplomats.

Some of my colleagues are driving for Uber after their day jobs, renting out their spare bedrooms to roommates and taking loans from their retirement funds simply to afford living in D.C. during their domestic assignments. The situation for my Foreign Service specialist colleagues, who typically earn less over the course of their careers than a generalist such as myself, can be even more acute

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6 ways data sharing can shape a better future

Economy, Policies

6 ways data sharing can shape a better future

The COVID-19 pandemic surfaced the shortcomings of the world’s collective approach to data. Inability – and sometimes unwillingness – to share and use data to combat COVID-19 or to protect against predatory uses of data have negatively impacted society. A lack of trust combined with asymmetric economic interests are slowing progress.

The importance of finding solutions to improve outcomes in times of crisis is undeniable, but enormous opportunities also exist across a myriad of ordinary use cases and for normal day-to-day life outcomes.

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