How health plans can reduce healthcare inequalities

Health, Policies

How health plans can reduce healthcare inequalities

The COVID-19 pandemic has put inequalities accessing the healthcare system in the spotlight. Jim Clement, Vice President of Product & Services at cloud provider Inovalon, tells us that health plans play the most integral role in advancing the health equity movement.

Why did it a global pandemic to highlight the issue of healthcare inequities? 

Health inequity in the US has been well understood by healthcare professionals for many years, but it has become more evident due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It wasn’t until the racial and ethnic differential seen in response to COVID-19 related infections, deaths and vaccinations that many Americans became acutely aware of the health inequity due to sociodemographic factors such as race, geography, education and income.

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40 years on: four action points essential to the global battle against HIV and AIDS

Health, Policies

40 years on: four action points essential to the global battle against HIV and AIDS

On 5 June 1981 a short report of five cases of pneumocystis pneumonia in young homosexual men in Los Angeles marked the discovery of AIDS, the first pandemic of the 20th century caused by a completely new virus, HIV.

Since then HIV has killed 33 million and infected 76 million people. Of the 38 million people living with HIV 27 million are now on life-saving treatment. This is a three-fold increase since 2010. But it still falls short of the global target of ensuring that 30 million people would be on treatment by 2020.

In fact, not one of the 2020 targets has been achieved. We are not even close. In 2020, there were 1.5 million new infections, three times the target of 500,000, and 690,000 deaths were reported, almost 200,000 more than the target of 500,000.

US Healthcare Spending—Rising Fast

Health, Policies

US Healthcare Spending—Rising Fast

U.S. healthcare expenditures greatly exceed spending levels in other developed countries. They are projected to increase at a substantial rate, but produce no better—and indeed sometimes worse—outcomes, according to research sponsored by the Peter G. Peterson Foundation.1  With national healthcare expenditure (NHE) estimated to reach $6.2 trillion by 2028, public policy experts, government officials, healthcare-sector leaders, business executives and ordinary citizens share mounting concern about the country’s ability to provide healthcare services that are fiscally responsible and attain acceptable levels of quality, effectiveness, and equity.2

Proposals to counter the increasing levels of U.S. healthcare expenditures abound. They include policies intended to achieve price transparency; alternatives to fee-for-service compensation, such as price controls based on Medicare fees or a percentage of negotiated in-network rates, as well as value-based and capitation systems; antitrust enforcement; simplification of administration;3 and wholesale restructuring of the sector’s present complex arrangements with a single-payer, governmental system for the entire population

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Introduction to Emergency Management (Butterworth-Heinemann Homeland Security)

Health, Policies

Introduction to Emergency Management (Butterworth-Heinemann Homeland Security)

Introduction to Emergency Management, Second Edition is a practical reference for students and professionals covering disaster response planning and mitigation. The book details the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) (U.S), the Federal Response Plan (FRP), and the roles, responsibilities, and interrelationship between FEMA and state and local emergency management systems. It also covers the changes in emergency management since the events of September 11, 2001, the latest information on the Office of Homeland Security, and includes several detailed appendices. This Second Edition is completely updated and continues this title’s success as a practical reference for students and professionals covering disaster response planning and mitigation.

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One Nation, Uninsured: Why the U.S. Has No National Health Insurance

Health, Policies

One Nation, Uninsured: Why the U.S. Has No National Health Insurance

Every industrial nation in the world guarantees its citizens access to essential health care services–every country, that is, except the United States. In fact, one in eight Americans–a shocking 43 million people–do not have any health care insurance at all.
One Nation, Uninsured offers a vividly written history of America’s failed efforts to address the health care needs of its citizens. Covering the entire twentieth century, Jill Quadagno shows how each attempt to enact national health insurance was met with fierce attacks by powerful
stakeholders, who mobilized their considerable resources to keep the financing of health care out of the government’s hands. Quadagno describes how at first physicians led the anti-reform coalition, fearful that government entry would mean government control of the lucrative private health care
market.

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How to protect healthcare workers – and improve pandemic preparedness

Health, Policies

How to protect healthcare workers – and improve pandemic preparedness

Worldwide, the COVID-19 pandemic underscored the structural vulnerabilities and lack of pandemic preparedness in our health systems.These vulnerabilities were further impacted by a shortage of healthcare workers.

The pandemic brought an unprecedented demand for healthcare capacity in clinics, hospitals, intensive care units and home-care. Healthcare workers were providing care at significantly longer hours in overwhelmed facilities, frequently with insufficient skills and training combined with a lack of protective equipment. With facilities understaffed, many workers were double-shifting as caregivers and providing clinical training to volunteers.

Food additive in Starbursts, Sour Patch Kids, Skittles, +3,000 others no longer considered safe

Health, Threats

Food additive in Starbursts, Sour Patch Kids, Skittles, +3,000 others no longer considered safe

A study conducted by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has deemed that titanium dioxide, an additive found in more than 3,000 ultra-processed foods, including Starbursts, Sour Patch Kids, Skittles, Jello, and Little Debbie snack cakes, may cause cell mutations and damage DNA.

This conclusion came after the review of hundreds of scientific studies. Titanium dioxide is a synthetic white pigment used to color processed foods. It’s extracted through a chemical process that utilizes sulfate or fluoride.

Titanium dioxide consists of nanoparticles that not only exist in certain food products but also topicals, such as sunscreen that we put on our skin. The additive has the ability to give foods a smooth texture on the tongue, Arizona State University professor Paul Westerhoff said.

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Fight for Your Health: Exposing the FDA’s Betrayal of America

Health, Policies

Fight for Your Health: Exposing the FDA’s Betrayal of America

Fight for Your Health: Exposing the FDA’s Betrayal of America is a stunning exposé into the secret world of the FDA, Wall Street, and drug companies. At stake is the health and well-being of all Americans. Adverse reactions, even deaths, are hidden while dangerous drugs are pushed on Americans, especially children simply for profit.

The FDA is actively attacking health freedom and seeking to eliminate natural health options. Arm yourself with invaluable information that will help you take charge of your health: + FDA working on behalf of drug companies + Mind-control through “mental health” + The true Codex story; health option control + Globalization at the expense of Americans + Poisoning us with our food and water + Your DNA in government computers.

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Community Nutrition in Action: An Entrepreneurial Approach, 4th edition

Health, Policies

Community Nutrition in Action: An Entrepreneurial Approach, 4th edition

COMMUNITY NUTRITION IN ACTION, FOURTH EDITION is the perfect text to introduce students to the program planning, policies, resources, and nutrition issues specific to community nutrition, providing an understanding of creating and implementing nutrition programs from various constituencies (elderly populations, children, impoverished populations, college students, etc.).

Successful practitioners in community nutrition have proven to have a mind and skill set that opens them up to new ideas and ventures. Incorporating an entrepreneurial approach, this text encourages students to learn how to take risks, try new technologies, and use fresh approaches to improving the public’s nutrition and health status.

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Harvard Researchers and Clinicians Battle ‘Silent Pandemic’ of Mental Health Issues

Health, Policies

Harvard Researchers and Clinicians Battle ‘Silent Pandemic’ of Mental Health Issues

For nearly 15 months, the Covid-19 pandemic has halted everyday life in the United States and much of the world. As in-person interactions shifted to screens, tens of millions of people were forced to adapt to life under the persistent threat of a lethal virus. Although vaccines have tempered cases, Americans have been subjected to a year of isolation and uncertainty, taking a significant toll on their mental health.

Researchers, clinical psychologists, and practicing psychiatrists at Harvard-affiliated hospitals have attempted to quantify and respond to the unprecedented national anguish while addressing persistent inequities in access to mental health resources and care.

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