Do immigrants harm native students academically?

Immigration, Policies

Do immigrants harm native students academically?

Over the past 50 years, the United States has experienced the second-largest wave of immigration in its history. As a result, the share of recent immigrants (either foreign-born or children of foreign-born) in public schools reached 23% in 2015, with concentrations over 70% in several school districts in high-immigration states. These trends have generated a policy debate about the effects of immigration on public education and the perceived costs that immigrants may impose on public schools, local governments, and educational outcomes of the U.S.-born student population.

Better understanding the causal effects of immigrants on native students is therefore critical to inform these policy debates, yet there are two factors that complicate any effort to reveal this link. First, immigrant students are not randomly assigned to schools, and are more likely to enroll in schools educating students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

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“They Take Our Jobs!”: And 20 Other Myths about Immigration (Myths Made in America)

Immigration, Policies

“They Take Our Jobs!”: And 20 Other Myths about Immigration (Myths Made in America)

Claims that immigrants take Americans’ jobs, are a drain on the American economy, contribute to poverty and inequality, destroy the social fabric, challenge American identity, and contribute to a host of social ills by their very existence are openly discussed and debated at all levels of society. Chomsky dismantles twenty of the most common assumptions and beliefs underlying statements like “I’m not against immigration, only illegal immigration” and challenges the misinformation in clear, straightforward prose.

In exposing the myths that underlie today’s debate, Chomsky illustrates how the parameters and presumptions of the debate distort how we think—and have been thinking—about immigration. She observes that race, ethnicity, and gender were historically used as reasons to exclude portions of the population from access to rights.

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How To Move To Canada

Immigration, Policies

How To Move To Canada

More and more Americans are thinking of moving to Canada to find a job, attend colleges and universities, peace of mind—even retirement—and whatever their motivations, they will have to navigate the Canadian immigration, citizenship, and naturalization processes.

So whether you’re thinking about moving or already have your bags packed, How to Move to Canada is for you. It’s a straightforward, friendly, informative handbook that delivers on its promise, providing readers with a thorough understanding of what to expect and where to get help and more information.

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State of Emergency: The Third World Invasion and Conquest of America

Immigration, Policies

State of Emergency: The Third World Invasion and Conquest of America

Pat Buchanan is sounding the alarm. Since 9/11, more than four million illegal immigrants have crossed our borders, and there are more coming every day. Our leaders in Washington lack the political will to uphold the rule of law. The Melting Pot is broken beyond repair, and the future of our nation is at stake.
In this important book, Pat Buchanan reveals that, slowly but surely, the great American Southwest is being reconquered by Mexico.

These lands—which many Mexicans believe are their birthright—are being detached ethnically, linguistically, and culturally from the United States by a deliberate policy of the Mexican regime. This is the “Aztlan Plot” for “La Reconquista,” the recapture of the lands lost by Mexico in the Texas War of Independence and Mexican-American War.

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In Mortal Danger: The Battle for America’s Border and Security

Immigration, Policies

In Mortal Danger: The Battle for America’s Border and Security

Congressman Tom Tancredo explains in cogent, rational detail how America is heading down the road to ruin. He believes that the incredible economic success and military prowess of the United States has transformed a nation founded on Judeo-Christian principles of right and wrong into an overindulgent, self-deprecating, immoral cesspool of depravity.

Without strong, moral leadership, without a renewed sense of purpose, without a rededication to family and community, without shunning the race hustlers and pop-culture sham artists, without protecting our borders, language, and culture, the nation that once was the land of the free and home of the brave”” and the “”one last hope of mankind”” will repeat the catastrophic mistakes of the past. “”In Mortal Danger”” is his prescription for repairing the damage.

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A Nation by Design: Immigration Policy in the Fashioning of America

Immigration, Policies

A Nation by Design: Immigration Policy in the Fashioning of America

According to the national mythology, the United States has long opened its doors to people from across the globe, providing a port in a storm and opportunity for any who seek it. Yet the history of immigration to the United States is far different. Even before the xenophobic reaction against European and Asian immigrants in the late nineteenth century, social and economic interest groups worked to manipulate immigration policy to serve their needs. In A Nation by Design, Aristide Zolberg explores American immigration policy from the colonial period to the present, discussing how it has been used as a tool of nation building.

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While Europe Slept: How Radical Islam is Destroying the West from Within

Immigration, Policies

While Europe Slept: How Radical Islam is Destroying the West from Within

The struggle for the soul of Europe today is every bit as dire and consequential as it was in the 1930s. Then, in Weimar, Germany, the center did not hold, and the light of civilization nearly went out. Today, the continent has entered yet another “Weimar moment.” Will Europeans rise to the challenge posed by radical Islam, or will they cave in once again to the extremists?

As an American living in Europe since 1998, Bruce Bawer has seen this problem up close. Across the continent—in Amsterdam, Oslo, Copenhagen, Paris, Berlin, Madrid, and Stockholm—he encountered large, rapidly expanding Muslim enclaves in which women were oppressed and abused, homosexuals persecuted and killed, “infidels” threatened and vilified, Jews demonized and attacked, barbaric traditions (such as honor killing and forced marriage) widely practiced, and freedom of speech and religion firmly repudiated.

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Whatever It Takes: Illegal Immigration, Border Security, and the War on Terror

Immigration, Policies

Whatever It Takes: Illegal Immigration, Border Security, and the War on Terror

Whatever It Takes is a wide-ranging and highly entertaining read, in which Congressman J. D. Hayworth exposes the ongoing battle where terrorists seek ways to exploit our porous borders and attack our homeland as well as the hypocrisy, greed, and political correctness that could literally destroy our nation.

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Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration

Immigration, Policies

Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration

In this age of multicultural democracy, the idea of assimilation–that the social distance separating immigrants and their children from the mainstream of American society closes over time–seems outdated and, in some forms, even offensive. But as Richard Alba and Victor Nee show in the first systematic treatment of assimilation since the mid-1960s, it continues to shape the immigrant experience, even though the geography of immigration has shifted from Europe to Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Institutional changes, from civil rights legislation to immigration law, have provided a more favorable environment for nonwhite immigrants and their children than in the past.

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Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America)

Immigration, Policies

Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America)

This book traces the origins of the “illegal alien” in American law and society, explaining why and how illegal migration became the central problem in U.S. immigration policy–a process that profoundly shaped ideas and practices about citizenship, race, and state authority in the twentieth century.

Mae Ngai offers a close reading of the legal regime of restriction that commenced in the 1920s–its statutory architecture, judicial genealogies, administrative enforcement, differential treatment of European and non-European migrants, and long-term effects. In well-drawn historical portraits, Ngai peoples her study with the Filipinos, Mexicans, Japanese, and Chinese who comprised, variously, illegal aliens, alien citizens, colonial subjects, and imported contract workers. She shows that immigration restriction, particularly national-origin and numerical quotas, re-mapped the nation both by creating new categories of racial difference and by emphasizing as never before the nation’s contiguous land borders and their patrol.

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