‘Stakeholder Capitalism,’ the Climate Wars, and Democracy

Economy, Policies, Society

‘Stakeholder Capitalism,’ the Climate Wars, and Democracy

The leftist objectives of “woke capitalism,” a phenomenon which is intertwined with “socially responsible” investment (SRI) and has at its base, stakeholder capitalism, have obscured the way in which this combination works owes far more to fascism than to socialism. Nearly 90 years ago, Roger Shaw, a progressive writer, described the New Deal as “employing Fascist means to gain liberal ends.” Overwrought, perhaps, but not without some truth to it. He would recognize what is going on now for what it is.

Capitalism and Mental Health

Policies, Society

Capitalism and Mental Health

David Matthews is a lecturer in sociology and social policy at Coleg Llandrillo, Wales, and the leader of its degree program in health and social care.

A mental-health crisis is sweeping the globe. Recent estimates by the World Health Organization suggest that more than three hundred million people suffer from depression worldwide. Furthermore, twenty-three million are said to experience symptoms of schizophrenia, while approximately eight hundred thousand individuals commit suicide each year.1 Within the monopoly-capitalist nations, mental-health disorders are the leading cause of life expectancy decline behind cardiovascular disease and cancer.

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Learning from history: community-run child-care centers during World War II

Policies, Society

Learning from history: community-run child-care centers during World War II

We face many big challenges. And we will need strong, bold policies to meaningfully address them. Solving our child-care crisis is one of those challenges, and a study of World War II government efforts to ensure accessible and affordable high-quality child care points the way to the kind of bold action we need.

The child care crisis

A number of studies have established that high-quality early childhood programs provide significant community and individual benefits.  One found that “per dollar invested, early childhood programs increase present value of state per capita earnings by $5 to $9.” Universal preschool programs have also been shown to offer significant benefits to all children, even producing better outcomes for the most disadvantaged children than means-tested programs. Yet, even before the pandemic, most families struggled with a lack of desirable child-care options.

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Inequalities are shaping how we’re fighting the Pandemic — and how we’ll remember it

Demographic, India, Policies, Society

Inequalities are shaping how we’re fighting the Pandemic — and how we’ll remember it

The first wave of the 1918-19 influenza pandemic did not have much impact in India; it was the second wave that was the most devastating.

It is now thought that 12 million people died in India during the flu pandemic, the equivalent of 4 percent of the population at that time. Most of these deaths were concentrated in a few short months from September to December 1918. This quote is from Punjab’s sanitary commissioner at the time:

The hospitals were choked so it was impossible to remove the dead quickly enough to make room for the dying….; the burning ghats (cremation site) were literally swamped with corpses; the depleted medical service, was incapable of dealing with more than a minute fraction of the sickness requiring attention.

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Everyday Life and the Ecological Crisis of Capitalism

Ecology, Policies, Society

Everyday Life and the Ecological Crisis of Capitalism

When it was first published in German in 2017, Ulrich Brand’s and Markus Wissen’s book The Imperial Mode of Living attracted widespread attention and was discussed in mainstream media, while, at the same time, fueling an intense debate within the German academic left. The multiple reactions were not by chance; they were the result of the provocative and innovative nature of the book. The authors claim that the dominant mode of living in the Global North, to a large extent, depends on the exploitation of people and natural resources in the Global South. Or put differently, the fact that we (as inhabitants of the Global North) can enjoy a relatively comfortable standard of living is based on a long history of the depletion of nature and the preservation of poor working conditions in other parts of the world.

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“Can the Working Class Change the World?” A bold call for reorganising the global working class

Policies, Society

“Can the Working Class Change the World?” A bold call for reorganising the global working class

The issue of reproductive work, massively occupied by women, is also highlighted in this account. It is crucial to point out that reproductive work, including social reproduction work, tends to be ignored in social studies at large. Yates also elaborates on the gender wage gap, sexual harassment and other threats in workplaces and their significance for workers. This reviewer argues that his elaboration on this problem constitutes an essential contribution to the field of research pioneered by Federici (2012), Bhattacharya (2017) and the like. Another problem which often gets overlooked – job-related mental health issues – is tackled separately in Chapter 4 of the book

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Americans must recognize economic classes

Policies, Society

Americans must recognize economic classes

This was excerpted from the holiday classic film “It’s a Wonderful Life.” It is one of the few times when the term “working class” was used in a widely seen cultural medium.

There appears to be a reluctance in the United States to wear the mantle of “working class.” Its connotation appears to be a relic from the economic revolutions of Europe in the late nineteenth century.

In the United States, the denotation is not worn proudly, but rather as having a slight tinge of being beneath the other more affluent and educated classes above it.

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Gender equality, sustainability and social justice: A roadmap for recovery

Policies, Society

Gender equality, sustainability and social justice: A roadmap for recovery

Women have been at the forefront of the world’s battle against COVID-19, as healthcare workers risking their lives, as scientists in teams that have developed vaccines at record speed, as carers in families and communities, setting up food banks and childcare cooperatives, and as political and public health leaders, steering us through the very worst of times.

At the same time, due to pre-existing gender inequalities, the social and economic impacts of the pandemic have hit women hardest. During the pandemic, women have lost their jobs and seen their earnings dwindle at a faster rate than men, with devastating impacts on their economic autonomy. This is because women tend to be concentrated in the most vulnerable informal jobs, which often lack basic rights and social protection.

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From Silent Gen to Gen Z – which U.S. generation has the most cultural power and influence?

Policies, Society

From Silent Gen to Gen Z – which U.S. generation has the most cultural power and influence?

This year, our team put together Visual Capitalist’s inaugural Generational Power Index (GPI), which looks at power dynamics across generations in America. We considered three categories in our quest to quantify power: economics, political, and cultural. And while it turns out Baby Boomers dominate when it comes to economics and political factors—cultural influence is a different story.

Here’s a look at which U.S. generation holds the most cultural power, and how this power dynamic is expected to shift in the coming years.

Generations and power, defined

Before we get started, it’s important to clarify which generations we’ve included in our research, along with their age and birth year ranges.

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Racism, Capitalism, and the Climate Crisis

Policies, Society

Racism, Capitalism, and the Climate Crisis

As we tried to connect the dots between the murder of George Floyd and our work to end the burning of fossil fuels, the connecting thread, without our naming it explicitly, was clearly capitalism.

For the past few years, I have worked with Fossil Free California, a mostly white group, trying to get the gigantic California pension funds to divest from fossil fuels. Two years ago, we embarked on an internal process to look at how race and racism operate within our organization.  We started to question how a narrow white perspective was framing our communications, our goals, and how we were structured. We looked at the ways that a lack of attention to relationships ended up centering white organizing styles.

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