Read: “The Lie of Global Prosperity” as a work of popular education (Science & Society)

Poverty, Threats

Read: “The Lie of Global Prosperity” as a work of popular education (Science & Society)

“This slim volume aims to pierce the veil of neoliberal triumphalism about self-declared progress over global poverty and inequality. As an introduction to these issues, the book succeeds quite well. The author’s intention is to synthesize the work of researchers from different fields into a work of ‘popular education’ directed to ‘revolutionary activists and participants in social movements’. Despite the author’s modesty, it should be noted that his activist work in Haiti lends the book a personal weight that, while not front and center, credits it with an earnestness it would otherwise lack.

The Lie of Global Prosperity is divided into two parts. The first part, the more central of the two, exposes serious problems in the methodology and measurement of global poverty used by global economic institutions, such as the World Bank.

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Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare

Other Atrocities, Threats

Artificial intelligence and the future of warfare

Artificial intelligence is changing the world we live in. It will redefine the workplace and have significant implications for everything we do, probably by the end of this decade. Some AI applications are already a part of our everyday lives, such as intelligent car navigation systems.

So, what is artificial intelligence? AI can be defined as ‘the ability of machines to perform tasks that normally require human intelligence’. AI has in fact been around for several decades. The IBM chess-playing computer called ‘Deep Blue’ defeated world chess champion Garry Kasparov as far back as 1997. But the development of AI has been accelerating rapidly in recent years with a substantial increase in the number of real-world applications where AI is now practical.

According to the US Department of Defense’s Joint Artificial Intelligence Center, the reasons for this are more massive datasets, increased computing power, improved machine-learning algorithms, and greater access to open-source code libraries.

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The rise of domestic terrorism is fueled mostly by far-right extremists, analysis shows

Terrorism, Threats

The rise of domestic terrorism is fueled mostly by far-right extremists, analysis shows

Domestic terrorism incidents have soared to new highs in the United States, driven chiefly by white-supremacist, anti-Muslim and anti-government extremists, the study shows.

Domestic terrorism incidents have soared to new highs in the United States, driven chiefly by white-supremacist, anti-Muslim and antigovernment extremists on the far right, according to a Washington Post analysis of data compiled by the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

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What qualifies as a hate crime and why are they so difficult to prove?

Threats, Transnational Crime

What qualifies as a hate crime and why are they so difficult to prove?

On March 31, a White man allegedly threw rocks at an Asian American woman’s car in Orange County, Calif. He was charged with a hate crime.

A few days later, in Riverside, Calif., Ke Chieh Meng was stabbed to death while walking her dog. The woman accused of stabbing her was not charged with a hate crime, but the victim’s family wonders whether she was targeted because of her race. What makes one incident a hate crime and the other not? It’s a perplexing question for victims’ families and allies

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Financing Border Wars

Threats, Transnational Crime

Financing Border Wars

The border industry, its financiers and human rights.

This report seeks to explore and highlight the extent of today’s global border security industry, by focusing on the most important geographical markets—Australia, Europe, USA—listing the human rights violations and risks involved in each sector of the industry, profiling important corporate players and putting a spotlight on the key investors in each company.

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Our history should unite and not divide us-Genocide survivor

Genocide, Threats

Our history should unite and not divide us-Genocide survivor

Honorine Hiana Uwimana was only nine months old when the genocide against Tutsi emerged.

Although she doesn’t hold a clear memory of what happened at the time, the agony and the scars left by that catastrophic moment echoed on what was yet to be her future, her family’s, and that of her country. Though she survived, some of her family members and friends didn’t make it. They were murdered, and never a day goes by without her siblings recounting how it all happened.

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Climate Change, Rich-Poor Gap, Conflict Likely to Grow: U.S. Intelligence Report

Ecology, Poverty, Threats

Climate Change, Rich-Poor Gap, Conflict Likely to Grow: U.S. Intelligence Report

Disease, the rich-poor gap, climate change and conflicts within and among nations will pose greater challenges in coming decades, with the COVID-19 pandemic already worsening some of those problems, a U.S. intelligence report said on Thursday.

The rivalry between China and a U.S.-led coalition of Western nations likely will intensify, fueled by military power shifts, demographics, technology and “hardening divisions over governance models,” said Global Trends 2040, produced by the U.S. National Intelligence Council (NIC).

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The Future of Cancer for Americans

Disease, Threats

The Future of Cancer for Americans

At first glance, it appears that little will change between now and 2040 when it comes to the types of cancers that people develop and that kill them, a new forecast shows.

Breast, melanoma, lung and colon cancers are expected to be the most common types of cancers in the United States, and patients die most often from lung, pancreatic, liver and colorectal cancers, according to the latest projections.

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A Novel Effort to See How Poverty Affects Young Brains

Poverty, Threats

A Novel Effort to See How Poverty Affects Young Brains

An emerging branch of neuroscience asks a question long on the minds of researchers. Recent stimulus payments make the study more relevant.

New monthly payments in the pandemic relief package have the potential to lift millions of American children out of poverty. Some scientists believe the payments could change children’s lives even more fundamentally — via their brains. It’s well established that growing up in poverty correlates with disparities in educational achievement, health and employment. But an emerging branch of neuroscience asks how poverty affects the developing brain.

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Great American Stories: World War I, Why We Fought

State War

Great American Stories: World War I, Why We Fought

On this date 104 years ago, a U.S. president broke a solemn election-year promise and committed Americans to fight and die on Europe’s battlefields in a war characterized by unfathomable human carnage.

Woodrow Wilson’s first recollections as a boy in Virginia and Georgia during the Civil War were of the lessons of loss. By 1917, human beings had become expert at killing: More soldiers died in the first few hours of the Battle of the Somme than in three days at Gettysburg.

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