The Politics of Post-Pandemic Education

Education, Policies

The Politics of Post-Pandemic Education

Spring break usually means a giddy escape from the classroom for children across America. This year, however, the millions of students who have not set foot in a classroom since last spring are celebrating by closing their laptops for a few days. Many of these students have no prospect of returning to class anytime soon — and their pandemic-shuttered schools have become the focus of an ugly battle among teachers’ unions, school boards, parents, and elected officials about how, and when, they should reopen.

As the politics of reopening have grown increasingly antagonistic and personal,[1] the pandemic is blurring partisan and racial cleavages around public education and creating new coalitions that could remain powerful players in local education politics. At stake is the fate of our public education system itself.

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What qualifies as a hate crime and why are they so difficult to prove?

Threats, Transnational Crime

What qualifies as a hate crime and why are they so difficult to prove?

On March 31, a White man allegedly threw rocks at an Asian American woman’s car in Orange County, Calif. He was charged with a hate crime.

A few days later, in Riverside, Calif., Ke Chieh Meng was stabbed to death while walking her dog. The woman accused of stabbing her was not charged with a hate crime, but the victim’s family wonders whether she was targeted because of her race. What makes one incident a hate crime and the other not? It’s a perplexing question for victims’ families and allies

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Financing Border Wars

Threats, Transnational Crime

Financing Border Wars

The border industry, its financiers and human rights.

This report seeks to explore and highlight the extent of today’s global border security industry, by focusing on the most important geographical markets—Australia, Europe, USA—listing the human rights violations and risks involved in each sector of the industry, profiling important corporate players and putting a spotlight on the key investors in each company.

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Our history should unite and not divide us-Genocide survivor

Genocide, Threats

Our history should unite and not divide us-Genocide survivor

Honorine Hiana Uwimana was only nine months old when the genocide against Tutsi emerged.

Although she doesn’t hold a clear memory of what happened at the time, the agony and the scars left by that catastrophic moment echoed on what was yet to be her future, her family’s, and that of her country. Though she survived, some of her family members and friends didn’t make it. They were murdered, and never a day goes by without her siblings recounting how it all happened.

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Diplomacy starts with domestic housing

Diplomacy, Policies

Diplomacy starts with domestic housing

If the United States is serious about leading with diplomacy, strengthening the State Department and diplomatic corps, and ensuring that the face of our nation abroad is more representative of our melting pot at home, it will require eliminating the disincentives to long-term training and to serving domestically for our nation’s diplomats.

Some of my colleagues are driving for Uber after their day jobs, renting out their spare bedrooms to roommates and taking loans from their retirement funds simply to afford living in D.C. during their domestic assignments. The situation for my Foreign Service specialist colleagues, who typically earn less over the course of their careers than a generalist such as myself, can be even more acute

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Faces of Unemployment: Waiting and appealing

Economy, Policies

Faces of Unemployment: Waiting and appealing

Toni Matis of West Bend has appeared on TMJ4 News before. She has been fighting to get unemployment benefits for nearly a year.

To get by, she rationed her medication. Today, she is on the verge of having her car repossessed. And says she would have lost her housing without the help of a sympathetic landlord. Her hearing was held one year to the day since she first started interacting with the unemployment system. After a year of fighting, an administrative law judge has ruled in her favor.

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6 ways data sharing can shape a better future

Economy, Policies

6 ways data sharing can shape a better future

The COVID-19 pandemic surfaced the shortcomings of the world’s collective approach to data. Inability – and sometimes unwillingness – to share and use data to combat COVID-19 or to protect against predatory uses of data have negatively impacted society. A lack of trust combined with asymmetric economic interests are slowing progress.

The importance of finding solutions to improve outcomes in times of crisis is undeniable, but enormous opportunities also exist across a myriad of ordinary use cases and for normal day-to-day life outcomes.

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Living on minimum wage

Policies, Society

Living on minimum wage

A national debate is underway in the United States over whether to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour from the current $7.25 an hour today, as more than 30 million U.S. citizens now live below the poverty line.

The last time the U.S. increased the hourly federal minimum wage was in 2009. According to economists and advocates, the $7 an hour rate in at least 20 U.S. states is to blame for the increase in poverty in the nation. However, in some states it’s legal to pay even lower than the minimum wage. For example, in the state of Wyoming, some residents are paid as little as $5.15 an hour or even less. And they haven’t seen a wage increase in 20 years.

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Climate Change, Rich-Poor Gap, Conflict Likely to Grow: U.S. Intelligence Report

Ecology, Poverty, Threats

Climate Change, Rich-Poor Gap, Conflict Likely to Grow: U.S. Intelligence Report

Disease, the rich-poor gap, climate change and conflicts within and among nations will pose greater challenges in coming decades, with the COVID-19 pandemic already worsening some of those problems, a U.S. intelligence report said on Thursday.

The rivalry between China and a U.S.-led coalition of Western nations likely will intensify, fueled by military power shifts, demographics, technology and “hardening divisions over governance models,” said Global Trends 2040, produced by the U.S. National Intelligence Council (NIC).

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The Future of Cancer for Americans

Disease, Threats

The Future of Cancer for Americans

At first glance, it appears that little will change between now and 2040 when it comes to the types of cancers that people develop and that kill them, a new forecast shows.

Breast, melanoma, lung and colon cancers are expected to be the most common types of cancers in the United States, and patients die most often from lung, pancreatic, liver and colorectal cancers, according to the latest projections.

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