Lethal Frontiers: A Soviet View of Nuclear Strategy, Weapons, and Negotiations

Proflieration, Threats

Lethal Frontiers: A Soviet View of Nuclear Strategy, Weapons, and Negotiations

Lethal Frontiers is one of the first samples of Soviet scholarship on nuclear strategy readily available to Western readers. A rising star in the Soviet foreign policy establishment, Arbatov offers a remarkable view of the evaluation of U.S. nuclear policy and strategy. This scholarly book is free of the ideological constraints and negative effects of excessive Soviet secrecy so often characterizing Soviet works on this subject. The author begins by tracing the buildup of U.S. nuclear and conventional forces during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, and examines initial U.S. reactions to the achievement of strategic nuclear parity by the Soviet Union in the late 1960s and early 1970s. From notions of flexible response, to the Schlesinger doctrine, and ideas of fighting a limited nuclear war, Arbatov argues that the U.S. national security establishment has had enormous difficulty in reconciling itself with Soviet strategic parity. Consequently, U.S. strategy and arms programs have invariably collided with and contradicted the arms control process and efforts to decrease U.S.-Soviet tensions. In light of this, and of the new Soviet approach to security, Arbatov observes the challenges lying ahead in the new era of Soviet-American relations.

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Venezuela’s Movimiento al Socialismo: From Guerrilla Defeat to Innovative Politics

Demographic, Venezuela

Venezuela’s Movimiento al Socialismo: From Guerrilla Defeat to Innovative Politics

Teodoro Petkoff and the other members of the Movimiento al Socialismo (MAS) in Venezuela had aroused the ire of the orthodox communist leaders by claiming to be both authentic communists and true nationalists, not bound by the dictates of either the Moscow or Maoist/Beijing wings of the party. To infuriate the traditionalists even further, Petkoff and his associates succeeded in being more than isolated critics, as MAS quickly eclipsed the traditional Venezuelan Communist Party and became that country’s leading leftist group.

The author places MAS in its international national, and historical contexts in order to determine the extent to which it is a unique communist party, as it claims to be. He traces the theory of “national democratic revolution, ” which MAS rejects, back to Lenin, and discusses the Latin American left’s reevaluation of that thesis. Ellner examines the guerrilla movement in Venezuela, the student movement of the late 1960s, and the emergence of the “New Left” in other countries, especially noting their influence on the formation of MAS. He also discusses the group’s role in Venezuelan elections and it’s relations with the other parties.

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Private Interests, Public Policy, and American Agriculture

Agriculture, Policies

Private Interests, Public Policy, and American Agriculture

Agriculture is at a critical juncture. The Food Security Act of 1985, which was intended to reduce surpluses by making American farm products more competitive in world markets, has not yet succeeded. Food imports have outstripped food exports. Huge grain surpluses continue to pile up. Because many farmers and economists fault federal agricultural policies for the current predicament, this book examines how recent policies, like the 1985 law, have been made and focuses on the key role that private interests play in the policy process.

Not only does Browne give us the first comprehensive study of all of the organized interests at work in agricultural policymaking, but he also makes an important contribution to understanding the interaction of organized interests in the American political process. His book should appeal to a wide audience composed of those interested in agriculture, policy process, and interest group behavior.

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Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders With America’s Illegal Aliens

Immigration, Policies

Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders With America’s Illegal Aliens

To discover what becomes of Mexicans who come illegally to the United States, Conover disguised himself as an illegal alien, traveling and working across America for more than a year. This is the chronicle of his journey.

“Ted Conover lived the bizarre life of the Mexican illegals. Theirs is a sub-terrestrial world of high-wire tensions, of brutal police, of sinister smugglers . . . A devastating document, this one must be read.”—Leon Uris

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Epidemiology in Medicine

Health, Policies

Epidemiology in Medicine

Epidemiology is the simplest and most direct method of studying the causes of disease in humans, and many major contributions have been made by studies that have demanded nothing more than the ability to count, to think logically, and to have an imaginative idea. With the accumulation of knowledge, however, its has become harder for individuals working alone to make effective contributions, and epidemiological research is becoming increasingly a matter of teamwork, not only because of the large number of people that may have to be studied and the large amount of data that have to be collected and analyzed, but also because of the need to bring together for the design and conduct of the study clinical experience, biological understanding, statistical expertise, and many other special skills that vary from one study to another.

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The Revolution Within the Revolution: Workers’ Control in Rural Portugal (Princeton Legacy Library, 427)

Agriculture, Policies

The Revolution Within the Revolution: Workers’ Control in Rural Portugal (Princeton Legacy Library, 427)

In this dramatic story of the making and unmaking of Portugal’s agrarian reform, Nancy Bermeo probes the origins and effects of the workers’ actions.

Originally published in 1986.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

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The Social Transformation of American Medicine: The rise of a sovereign profession and the making of a vast industry

Health, Policies

The Social Transformation of American Medicine: The rise of a sovereign profession and the making of a vast industry

Winner of the 1983 Pulitzer Prize and the Bancroft Prize in American History, this is a landmark history of how the entire American health care system of doctors, hospitals, health plans, and government programs has evolved over the last two centuries.

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The Ecology of Neotropical Savannas

Demographic, Venezuela

The Ecology of Neotropical Savannas

Savanna ecosystems play a major role in the natural landscape and in the economic life of vast areas of the tropics. These grasslands are inherently fragile, yet Third World economic development makes human exploitation inevitable. The question that remains is whether utilization of the savannas for agriculture and other purposes will create sustained economic growth or a desert waste.

Guillermo Sarmiento is an unquestionable authority on the grasslands of the New World. His book is the first modern, integrated view of the genesis and function of this important natural system–a synthesis of savanna architecture, seasonal rhythms, productive processes, and water and nutrient economy. Sarmiento’s emphasis is on the Venezuelan savannas that he has spent a lifetime studying, but his outlook is far broader. He makes frequent comparisons with other neotropical and tropical savannas and with temperate prairies, and he offers conclusions of global importance, not only for ecologists and agronomist but for anyone concerned with the politics of Third World development.

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Early Latin America: A History of Colonial Spanish America and Brazil

Brazil, Demographic

Early Latin America: A History of Colonial Spanish America and Brazil

This book provides a general history of Latin America in the period between the European conquest and the gaining of independence by the Spanish American countries and Brazil (approximately 1492–1825). It is both an introduction for the student at the college level and a provisionally updated synthesis of the quickly changing field for the more experienced reader. The authors’ aim is not only to treat colonial Brazil and colonial Spanish America in a single volume, something rarely done, but also to view early Latin America as one unit with a centre and peripheries, all parts of which were characterized by variants of the same kinds of change, regardless of national and imperial borders.

The authors integrate both the older and the newer historical literature, seeing legal, institutional, and political phenomena within a social, economic, and cultural context. They incorporate insights from other disciplines and newer techniques of historical research, but eschew jargon or technical concepts. The approach of the book, with its emphasis on broad social and economic trends across large areas and long time periods, does much to throw light on Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well.

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