Islam Observed: Religious Development in Morocco and Indonesia (Phoenix Books)

Demographic, Indonesia

Islam Observed: Religious Development in Morocco and Indonesia (Phoenix Books)

“In four brief chapters,” writes Clifford Geertz in his preface, “I have attempted both to lay out a general framework for the comparative analysis of religion and to apply it to a study of the development of a supposedly single creed, Islam, in two quite contrasting civilizations, the Indonesian and the Moroccan.”

Mr. Geertz begins his argument by outlining the problem conceptually and providing an overview of the two countries. He then traces the evolution of their classical religious styles which, with disparate settings and unique histories, produced strikingly different spiritual climates. So in Morocco, the Islamic conception of life came to mean activism, moralism, and intense individuality, while in Indonesia the same concept emphasized aestheticism, inwardness, and the radical dissolution of personality. In order to assess the significance of these interesting developments, Mr. Geertz sets forth a series of theoretical observations concerning the social role of religion.

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Prejudice, War and the Constitution: Causes and Consequences of the Evacuation of the Japanese Americans in World War II

Civil War, Threats

Prejudice, War and the Constitution: Causes and Consequences of the Evacuation of the Japanese Americans in World War II

During World War II, 110,000 citizens and resident aliens of Japanese ancestry were banished from their homes and confined behind barbed wire for two and a half years. This comprehensive work surveys the historical origins, political characteristics, and legal consequences of that calamitous episode,

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Military Crisis Management: U.S. Intervention in the Dominican Republic, 1965 (Contributions to the Study of World Literature)

Civil War, Threats

Military Crisis Management: U.S. Intervention in the Dominican Republic, 1965 (Contributions to the Study of World Literature)

This account of the 1965 Dominican intervention is a case study in U.S. crisis management. Herbert Schoonmaker analyzes the role and management of U.S. military forces in the Dominican crisis. Like other Cold War interventions, the Dominican intervention demonstrated the use of rapidly reacting, joint military forces to achieve limited political objectives. It also represents a good vehicle for analyzing U.S. civilian-military relationships during this kind of military operation.

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