Illicit Flows and Criminal Things: States, Borders, and the Other Side of Globalization (Tracking Globalization)

Threats, Transnational Crime

Illicit Flows and Criminal Things: States, Borders, and the Other Side of Globalization (Tracking Globalization)

Illicit Flows and Criminal Things offers a new perspective on illegal transnational linkages, international relations, and the transnational. The contributors argue for a nuanced approach that recognizes the difference between “organized” crime and the thousands of illicit acts that take place across national borders every day. They distinguish between the illegal (prohibited by law) and the illicit (socially perceived as unacceptable), which are historically changeable and contested. Detailed case studies of arms smuggling, illegal transnational migration, the global diamond trade, borderland practices, and the transnational consumption of drugs take us to Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe, and North America. They allow us to understand how states, borders, and the language of law enforcement produce criminality, and how people and goods which are labeled “illegal” move across regulatory spaces.

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The Making of the Indian Atomic Bomb: Science, Secrecy and the Postcolonial State (Postcolonial Encounters)

Proflieration, Threats

The Making of the Indian Atomic Bomb: Science, Secrecy and the Postcolonial State (Postcolonial Encounters)

In 1974 India exploded an atomic device. In May 1998 the new right-wing BJP Government set off several more, encountering in the process domestic plaudits, but also international condemnation and possibly sparking a new nuclear arms race in South Asia.

What explains the enthusiasm of the Indian public for nuclear power? This book is the first serious historical account of the development of India’s nuclear programme and of how the bomb came to be made. The author questions orthodox interpretations implying that it was a product of international conflict. Instead, he argues that the explosions had nothing to do with national security as conventionally understood and everything to do with establishing the legitimacy of the independent nation-state. He demonstrates the linkages that exist between the two apparently separate discourses of national security and national development.

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