How We End the Forever War

Policies, Terrorism

How We End the Forever War

The U.S. does not know how to end its wars. Even when US troops are withdrawn from another country, US involvement in the war there does not necessarily end. The Trump administration pulled troops out of Somalia last year, but US military operations in Somalia continue. President Biden has committed to withdrawing the remaining troops from Afghanistan, but it is simply understood that US special forces, drones, and jets will continue to conduct operations in the country for the foreseeable future. The troops move, but the wars continue.

As if to drive this point home, Gen. McKenzie, the head of CENTCOM, recently stated that the war on terrorism “is probably not going to end.” He could have dropped the probably. When the goals of a war are unachievable, it is not possible for the war to end when our government is determined to keep fighting it no matter what. Like every other war the US has fought since 1945, the forever war is a war of choice. Unless there are major changes in policy, the “war on terror” will outlive the US troop presence in Afghanistan.

Read More

 

The International Far-Right Terrorist Threat Requires a Multilateral Response

Terrorism, Threats

The International Far-Right Terrorist Threat Requires a Multilateral Response

Right-wing violence is a global phenomenon. The United Nations Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED) illuminated this global challenge in 2020 when it issued an alert that cited “a 320% increase in terrorist attacks by groups or individuals affiliated” with right-wing extremism. A U.S.-only focus to countering far-right terrorism will not curb this growing threat to international peace and stability.

Though there are challenges to organizing a multilateral response, the United States, the United Nations, and other partners have tools available that they can adapt from efforts to disrupt the financing and organization of jihadist terrorist groups.

Read Full Article

 

Triple Cross: How bin Laden’s Master Spy Penetrated the CIA, the Green Berets, and the FBI–and Why Patrick Fitzgerald Failed to Stop Him

Policies, Security

Triple Cross: How bin Laden’s Master Spy Penetrated the CIA, the Green Berets, and the FBI–and Why Patrick Fitzgerald Failed to Stop Him

The author of 1000 Years for Revenge and Cover Up profiles triple-agent Ali Mohamed, a trusted security advisor for Osama bin Laden who also worked as a Special Forces counselor, FBI informant, and CIA operative for more than ten years while helping to orchestrate Al Qaeda plans that eventually led to the September 11 attacks. 50,000 first printing.

Read More

 

The Powers of War and Peace: The Constitution and Foreign Affairs after 9/11

Diplomacy, Policies

The Powers of War and Peace: The Constitution and Foreign Affairs after 9/11

Since the September 11 attacks on the United States, the Bush administration has come under fire for its methods of combating terrorism. Waging war against al Qaeda has proven to be a legal quagmire, with critics claiming that the administration’s response in Afghanistan and Iraq is unconstitutional. The war on terror—and, in a larger sense, the administration’s decision to withdraw from the ABM Treaty and the Kyoto accords—has many wondering whether the constitutional framework for making foreign affairs decisions has been discarded by the present administration.

John Yoo, formerly a lawyer in the Department of Justice, here makes the case for a completely new approach to understanding what the Constitution says about foreign affairs, particularly the powers of war and peace. Looking to American history, Yoo points out that from Truman and Korea to Clinton’s intervention in Kosovo, American presidents have had to act decisively on the world stage without a declaration of war.

Read More

 

Dunces of Doomsday: 10 Blunders That Gave Rise to Radical Islam, Terrorist Regimes, and the Threat of an American Hiroshima

Terrorism, Threats

Dunces of Doomsday: 10 Blunders That Gave Rise to Radical Islam, Terrorist Regimes, and the Threat of an American Hiroshima

Presents the history of United States’ foreign policy with Islamic countries, beginning with the Carter administration through the present day and discussing how mistakes and miscalculations have fueled the current rise of al Qaeda and Islamic terrorism around the world.

Read More

 

Against All Enemies: Inside America’s War on Terror

Terrorism, Threats

Against All Enemies: Inside America’s War on Terror

“On the day of the meeting [September 4, 2001], Clarke sent Rice an impassioned personal note. He criticized U.S. counterterrorism efforts past and present. The ‘real question’ before the principals, he wrote, was ‘are we serious about dealing with the al Qida threat?…Is al Qida a big deal?…Decision makers should imagine themselves on a future day when the CSG has not succeeded in stopping al Qida attacks and hundreds of Americans lay dead in several countries, including the US,’ Clarke wrote. ‘What would those decision makers wish that they had done earlier? That future day could happen at any time.'”

Read More

 

 

Blood From Stones: The Secret Financial Network of Terror

Demographic, Wild Cards

Blood From Stones: The Secret Financial Network of Terror

In the aftermath of 9/11, President Bush froze all terrorist assets in traditional financial institutions and money channels. But Al Qaeda and other terrorist groups have long followed a diversification strategy that has rendered the crackdown by the U.S. and other governments almost useless. Blood from Stones is the first book to uncover, through on-the-ground reporting, the interlocking web of commodities, underground transfer systems, charities, and sympathetic bankers that support terrorist activities throughout the world.

Read More

 

See No Evil: The True Story of a Ground Soldier in the CIA’s War on Terrorism

State War, Threats

See No Evil: The True Story of a Ground Soldier in the CIA’s War on Terrorism

In his explosive New York Times bestseller, top CIA operative Robert Baer paints a chilling picture of how terrorism works on the inside and provides startling evidence of how Washington politics sabotaged the CIA’s efforts to root out the world’s deadliest terrorists, allowing for the rise of Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda and the continued entrenchment of Saddam Hussein in Iraq.

Read More