Healthcare Systems Around the World

Health, Policies

Healthcare Systems Around the World

There are many philosophies shaping healthcare services around the world, and this article glances at some prominent examples. This may help understand why different countries experience healthcare differently.

The USA does not have a universal, free healthcare program, unlike most other developed countries. Instead, in line with the free-market-virtue mindset, most Americans are served by a mix of publicly and privately funded programs and healthcare systems.

Most hospitals and clinics are privately owned, with about 60% being non-profits, and another fifth being for-profit facilities. Coverage by federal and state programs is partial, and most insured Americans have employment-based private insurance.

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Historical Dictionary of the Dirty Wars (Historical Dictionaries of War, Revolution, and Civil Unrest)

Civil War, Policies, Threats

Historical Dictionary of the Dirty Wars (Historical Dictionaries of War, Revolution, and Civil Unrest)

Historical Dictionary of the “Dirty Wars” covers the most recent period of military dictatorship in Argentina (1976-1983), Chile (1973-1990), and Uruguay (1973-1985), when national-security regimes waged war against suspected subversives. The chief targets were leftists, especially armed guerrillas and their supporters, though “subversive” came to include anyone perceived to be a threat to the status quo.

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Unspeakable Truths: Confronting State Terror and Atrocity

Other Atrocities, Threats

Unspeakable Truths: Confronting State Terror and Atrocity

This book is a profound exploration of truth commissions around the world, and the anguish, injustice, and the legacy of hate they are meant to absolve. Hayner examines twenty major truth commissions established around the world paying special attention to South Africa, El Salvador, Argentina, Chile, and Guatemala.

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Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History after Genocide and Mass Violence

Genocide, Threats

Between Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History after Genocide and Mass Violence

The rise of collective violence and genocide is the twentieth century’s most terrible legacy. Martha Minow, a Harvard law professor and one of our most brilliant and humane legal minds, offers a landmark book on our attempts to heal after such large-scale tragedy.

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