Food additive in Starbursts, Sour Patch Kids, Skittles, +3,000 others no longer considered safe

Health, Threats

Food additive in Starbursts, Sour Patch Kids, Skittles, +3,000 others no longer considered safe

A study conducted by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has deemed that titanium dioxide, an additive found in more than 3,000 ultra-processed foods, including Starbursts, Sour Patch Kids, Skittles, Jello, and Little Debbie snack cakes, may cause cell mutations and damage DNA.

This conclusion came after the review of hundreds of scientific studies. Titanium dioxide is a synthetic white pigment used to color processed foods. It’s extracted through a chemical process that utilizes sulfate or fluoride.

Titanium dioxide consists of nanoparticles that not only exist in certain food products but also topicals, such as sunscreen that we put on our skin. The additive has the ability to give foods a smooth texture on the tongue, Arizona State University professor Paul Westerhoff said.

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Miranda rights: Where did the right to remain silent come from

Justice, Policies

Miranda rights: Where did the right to remain silent come from

Sgt. Joe Friday on “Dragnet” delivered the lines we have all heard on TV cop shows for years in his characteristic monotone, just-the-facts-ma’am voice.

Wisecracking “Law and Order” detective Lennie Briscoe always added a little dig when he put the cuffs on a bad guy. “You probably know this next part by heart. You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law …” Briscoe said in one episode of the popular crime drama that enjoyed a 20-year run and spawned several spinoffs.

Everyone who he ever turned on the television probably knows those 41 words just as well as or better than they know the Pledge of Allegiance.

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The Politics of Post-Pandemic Education

Education, Policies

The Politics of Post-Pandemic Education

Spring break usually means a giddy escape from the classroom for children across America. This year, however, the millions of students who have not set foot in a classroom since last spring are celebrating by closing their laptops for a few days. Many of these students have no prospect of returning to class anytime soon — and their pandemic-shuttered schools have become the focus of an ugly battle among teachers’ unions, school boards, parents, and elected officials about how, and when, they should reopen.

As the politics of reopening have grown increasingly antagonistic and personal,[1] the pandemic is blurring partisan and racial cleavages around public education and creating new coalitions that could remain powerful players in local education politics. At stake is the fate of our public education system itself.

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How Native Americans were vaccinated against smallpox, then pushed off their land

Disease, Threats

How Native Americans were vaccinated against smallpox, then pushed off their land

More than 180 years ago, the federal government launched the largest effort of its kind in the United States to vaccinate Native Americans against the deadly disease of smallpox.

With it ravaging Native American communities in the 1830s, the disease became a widespread public health crisis and threatened to curtail the government’s massive effort to force thousands of Native Americans from their lands in the East and push them West to reservations.

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Make it rain: US states embrace ‘cloud seeding’ to try to conquer drought

Ecology, Threats

Make it rain: US states embrace ‘cloud seeding’ to try to conquer drought

Cloud seeding involves adding small particles of silver iodide to clouds to spur rainfall – but will it work?

With three-quarters of the US west gripped by a seemingly ceaseless drought, several states are increasingly embracing a drastic intervention – the modification of the weather to spur more rainfall.

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