Factory to the World?

Demographic, India

Factory to the World?

The Production Linked Incentive Scheme aims to build an Indian manufacturing base across 13 key sectors. What works. What doesn’t

On March 10, the $274 billion, Cupertino, California-based Apple Inc. announced it is starting production of the 5G-compatible iPhone 12 in India. It appeared like a routine announcement. After all, Apple has been assembling older generation iPhones in India through contract manufacturers since 2017. It wasn’t.

It might have been a small step for Apple but was a giant leap for Indian manufacturing. India’s new Production Linked Incentive (PLI) Scheme to reduce import dependence and promote local manufacturing had lured three of Apple’s Taiwanese original equipment manufacturers – Foxconnn Hon Hai, Wistron and Pegatron – to pump in millions of dollars to expand Indian facilities. They will move a step up from assembling imported parts here to making or sourcing more components locally. Like Apple, about 70 firms have shown interest in availing the PLI Scheme to set up manufacturing facilities in three key sectors: mobile and electronic components; pharma-APIs (active pharmaceutical ingredients); KSM (key starting materials) and medical devices.

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Covid-19 changed education in America — permanently

Education, Policies

Covid-19 changed education in America — permanently

It’s been a school year like no other. Here’s what we learned.

There was a moment last spring when every parent and employer in America suddenly realized how deeply their lives and livelihoods depended on an institution too often in the background and taken for granted: the nation’s schools.

With almost no notice, adults and children found themselves in the middle of a massive national experiment in new ways of teaching and learning, and new ways of dividing responsibilities between home, school and work.

A year later, it’s clear that the Covid-19 pandemic has changed education in America in lasting ways, and glimpses of that transformed system are already emerging.

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Read: “The Lie of Global Prosperity” as a work of popular education (Science & Society)

Poverty, Threats

Read: “The Lie of Global Prosperity” as a work of popular education (Science & Society)

“This slim volume aims to pierce the veil of neoliberal triumphalism about self-declared progress over global poverty and inequality. As an introduction to these issues, the book succeeds quite well. The author’s intention is to synthesize the work of researchers from different fields into a work of ‘popular education’ directed to ‘revolutionary activists and participants in social movements’. Despite the author’s modesty, it should be noted that his activist work in Haiti lends the book a personal weight that, while not front and center, credits it with an earnestness it would otherwise lack.

The Lie of Global Prosperity is divided into two parts. The first part, the more central of the two, exposes serious problems in the methodology and measurement of global poverty used by global economic institutions, such as the World Bank.

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What’s in it for us: added value-based approach towards telehealth

Health, Policies

What’s in it for us: added value-based approach towards telehealth

After interviewing various stakeholders from public and private healthcare systems (in Lithuania and the US), researchers Dr Agne Gadeikiene, Prof Asta Pundziene, Dr Aiste Dovaliene from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania designed a detailed structure revealing added value of remote healthcare services, i.e. telehealth. Adopting the concept of value co-creation common in business research to healthcare, the scientists claim that this is the first comprehensive analysis of this kind in the healthcare field involving two different healthcare systems.

According to the researchers, although in the US the consultations via phone with physician have been available for more than fifty years, the technological development of recent years has radically changed the concept of telehealth.

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How bad is prison health care in the Unites States

Health, Policies

How bad is prison health care in the Unites States

Prisons have continued to be the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic — the largest single-site cluster outbreaks have been in carceral settings. At the outset of the pandemic, reports of poor testing and lack of appropriate personal protective equipment in prisons abounded, turning much needed attention to the quality of health care in correctional facilities far and wide.

But this is an old problem, says Adnan Khan. He spent 16 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. In 2019, he was resentenced under a California Senate bill that set the path for his eventual release. Now, he runs Re:Store Justice, an advocacy organization he founded while behind bars that works to end extreme sentencing.

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The Politics of Post-Pandemic Education

Education, Policies

The Politics of Post-Pandemic Education

Spring break usually means a giddy escape from the classroom for children across America. This year, however, the millions of students who have not set foot in a classroom since last spring are celebrating by closing their laptops for a few days. Many of these students have no prospect of returning to class anytime soon — and their pandemic-shuttered schools have become the focus of an ugly battle among teachers’ unions, school boards, parents, and elected officials about how, and when, they should reopen.

As the politics of reopening have grown increasingly antagonistic and personal,[1] the pandemic is blurring partisan and racial cleavages around public education and creating new coalitions that could remain powerful players in local education politics. At stake is the fate of our public education system itself.

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Diplomacy starts with domestic housing

Diplomacy, Policies

Diplomacy starts with domestic housing

If the United States is serious about leading with diplomacy, strengthening the State Department and diplomatic corps, and ensuring that the face of our nation abroad is more representative of our melting pot at home, it will require eliminating the disincentives to long-term training and to serving domestically for our nation’s diplomats.

Some of my colleagues are driving for Uber after their day jobs, renting out their spare bedrooms to roommates and taking loans from their retirement funds simply to afford living in D.C. during their domestic assignments. The situation for my Foreign Service specialist colleagues, who typically earn less over the course of their careers than a generalist such as myself, can be even more acute

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Energy and Human Ambitions on a Finite Planet: Review

Energy, Policies

Energy and Human Ambitions on a Finite Planet: Review

This book, Energy and Human Ambitions on a Finite Planet, by Tom Murphy (TM), grew out of a course at University of California (San Diego), so it should be regarded both as a textbook and as a book for a wide general readership. This reviewer has also taught similar material at the introductory level to undergraduates, so its suitability can be verified for the classroom – particularly with all the useful suggested questions that can be posed for students..

The message in this book is simple, stated clearly towards the end of the first chapter. There are hard physical limits to the growth of available energy to power our civilization and these will probably be seriously in effect by the end of the 21st century. TM judges we are undoubtedly closer to the end of growth than we were at its beginning in the 19th century.

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Giving kids an early financial education pays off in the future

Education, Policies

Giving kids an early financial education pays off in the future

State of financial education: Many money problems Americans face could have been avoided if financial literacy was taught earlier in school. That knowledge helps create a foundation for students to build strong money habits early and avoid many mistakes that lead to a lifelong of money struggles. This story is part of a series looking at the current financial education landscape in this country

As a child growing up in a Latino community in East Palo Alto, California, “the only thing we knew about money was that it’s always tough being low-income,” said Karina Macias, 26.

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