How lockdown is leading to endemic levels of ‘brain fog’

Policies, Society

How lockdown is leading to endemic levels of ‘brain fog’

Our brains come alive in the presence of others. Incarceration is having a negative impact on our grey matter.

London-based psychoanalyst Josh Cohen, author of the self-help book How to Live, What to Do, notes how where once patients came into his consulting room to lie down on the couch and chat about the weather, the weirdos on the tube, the traffic or the variegated politics of office life, they now appear on his computer screen and tell him, most prevalently, about the dreaded descent of brain fog on their once lucid, razor-sharp minds. That hazy, sluggish feeling of not being able to remember events with precision and in technicolour detail is becoming recurrent, cognition slowed under lockdown to levels of much retarded velocity than we were used to pre-Covid when being busy interacting in real time and physical space with others kept our grey matter functioning at optimum levels.

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Beyond Pandemic’s Upheaval, a Racial Wealth Gap Endures

Economy, Policies

Beyond Pandemic’s Upheaval, a Racial Wealth Gap Endures

Billions in aid has been dispensed, and the social safety net has been reinforced. Will there be more ambitious steps to address longtime inequities?

Not since Lyndon Baines Johnson’s momentous civil rights and anti-poverty legislation has an American president so pointedly put racial and economic equity at the center of his agenda.

President Biden’s multitrillion-dollar initiatives to rebuild infrastructure in neglected and segregated neighborhoods, increase wages for health care workers, expand the safety net and make pre-K and college more accessible are all shot through with attention to the particular economic disadvantages that face racial minorities. So were his sweeping pandemic relief bill and Inauguration Day executive orders.

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States of Denial: Knowing about Atrocities and Suffering

Other Atrocities, Threats

States of Denial: Knowing about Atrocities and Suffering

Blocking out, turning a blind eye, shutting off, not wanting to know, wearing blinkers, seeing what we want to see … these are all expressions of ‘denial’. Alcoholics who refuse to recognize their condition, people who brush aside suspicions of their partner’s infidelity, the wife who doesn’t notice that her husband is abusing their daughter – are supposedly ‘in denial’. Governments deny their responsibility for atrocities, and plan them to achieve ‘maximum deniability’. Truth Commissions try to overcome the suppression and denial of past horrors. Bystander nations deny their responsibility to intervene.

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