How We End the Forever War

Policies, Terrorism

How We End the Forever War

The U.S. does not know how to end its wars. Even when US troops are withdrawn from another country, US involvement in the war there does not necessarily end. The Trump administration pulled troops out of Somalia last year, but US military operations in Somalia continue. President Biden has committed to withdrawing the remaining troops from Afghanistan, but it is simply understood that US special forces, drones, and jets will continue to conduct operations in the country for the foreseeable future. The troops move, but the wars continue.

As if to drive this point home, Gen. McKenzie, the head of CENTCOM, recently stated that the war on terrorism “is probably not going to end.” He could have dropped the probably. When the goals of a war are unachievable, it is not possible for the war to end when our government is determined to keep fighting it no matter what. Like every other war the US has fought since 1945, the forever war is a war of choice. Unless there are major changes in policy, the “war on terror” will outlive the US troop presence in Afghanistan.

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Fighting in Disguise: The unspoken female soldiers of Gettysburg

Civil War, Threats

Fighting in Disguise: The unspoken female soldiers of Gettysburg

We don’t often talk about girl power when discussing the Civil War. This is because military accomplishments are typically dominated by men — in the past and the present. So, as history continues to overshadow women’s contributions, it’s not surprising that most people aren’t aware of the numerous female soldiers who fought in the Battle of Gettysburg — and in the Civil War as a whole.

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Diet For A Dead Planet: How The Food Industry Is Killing Us

Agriculture, Policies

Diet For A Dead Planet: How The Food Industry Is Killing Us

A harrowing indictment of industrial agriculture’s threat to food safety and the environment argues that America’s food industry is in crisis, citing escalating levels of food-related sickness, chemical use, misdirected funding, and intentionally wasted produce, in a cautionary analysis that documents growing support of organic food and farmer’s markets. 10,000 first printing.

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