Lessons Learned From a Year of Closed Schools

Education, Policies

Lessons Learned From a Year of Closed Schools

An outbreak at a senior home, which would ultimately be linked to at least 37 deaths, had already shuttered three schools in the 24,000-student district for deep cleaning, the central office was inundated with calls and emails from frantic parents and school staff reporting potential new exposures and more than 20% of students had stopped coming in at all.

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Nobodies: Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy

Other Atrocities, Threats

Nobodies: Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy

Most Americans are shocked to discover that slavery still exists in the United States. Yet 145 years after the Emancipation Proclamation, the CIA estimates that 14,500 to17,000 foreigners are “trafficked” annually into the United States, threatened with violence, and forced to work against their will.

Modern people unanimously agree that slavery is abhorrent. How, then, can it be making a reappearance on American soil?

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Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America

Poverty, Threats

Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America

The New York Times bestseller, and one of the most talked about books of the year, Nickel and Dimed has already become a classic of undercover reportage.

Millions of Americans work for poverty-level wages, and one day Barbara Ehrenreich decided to join them. She was inspired in part by the rhetoric surrounding welfare reform, which promised that any job equals a better life. But how can anyone survive, let alone prosper, on $6 to $7 an hour? To find out, Ehrenreich moved from Florida to Maine to Minnesota, taking the cheapest lodgings available and accepting work as a waitress, hotel maid, house cleaner, nursing-home aide, and Wal-Mart salesperson.

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American Holocaust: The Conquest of the New World

Genocide, Threats

American Holocaust: The Conquest of the New World

For four hundred years from the first Spanish assaults against the Arawak people of Hispaniola in the 1490s to the U.S. Army’s massacre of Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in the 1890s the indigenous inhabitants of North and South America endured an unending firestorm of violence. During that time the native population of the Western Hemisphere declined by as many as 100 million people

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