The controversial future of nuclear power in the U.S.

Energy, Policies

The controversial future of nuclear power in the U.S.

As the climate crisis worsens, the discussion intensifies over what role nuclear power should play in fighting it.

The Money Plot: A History of Currency’s Power to Enchant, Control, and Manipulate

Economy, Policies

The Money Plot: A History of Currency’s Power to Enchant, Control, and Manipulate

Money obeys the rules of math, but math does not rule money. When it comes to creating and sustaining faith in a currency, the principles of narrative reign supreme. Like great characters, great currencies develop. The dollar faltered for more than 100 years after its founding. It teetered into the 20th century, then much like an adolescent on the verge of adulthood, matured and regressed in equal measure until, by the middle of the same century, it was ready to rescue the franc, the lira, the mark, the pound and the yen.

Heroes often discard logic and reason in favor of fury and passion; likewise, the impulses that motivated the greatest character ever invented. Molded from farmland, flesh, fish, forests, sugar and slaves, the dollar was and always would be synonymous with the American spirit. It epitomized the vision of Alexander Hamilton, Andrew Jackson, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan. Nothing would surpass it.

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What qualifies as a hate crime and why are they so difficult to prove?

Threats, Transnational Crime

What qualifies as a hate crime and why are they so difficult to prove?

On March 31, a White man allegedly threw rocks at an Asian American woman’s car in Orange County, Calif. He was charged with a hate crime.

A few days later, in Riverside, Calif., Ke Chieh Meng was stabbed to death while walking her dog. The woman accused of stabbing her was not charged with a hate crime, but the victim’s family wonders whether she was targeted because of her race. What makes one incident a hate crime and the other not? It’s a perplexing question for victims’ families and allies

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Great American Stories: World War I, Why We Fought

State War

Great American Stories: World War I, Why We Fought

On this date 104 years ago, a U.S. president broke a solemn election-year promise and committed Americans to fight and die on Europe’s battlefields in a war characterized by unfathomable human carnage.

Woodrow Wilson’s first recollections as a boy in Virginia and Georgia during the Civil War were of the lessons of loss. By 1917, human beings had become expert at killing: More soldiers died in the first few hours of the Battle of the Somme than in three days at Gettysburg.

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United States: Pandemic Impact on People in Poverty

Poverty, Threats

United States: Pandemic Impact on People in Poverty

The United States government has made little progress in stemming the rise in poverty and inequality during the Covid-19 pandemic, Human Rights Watch said today. The government should take urgent action to address the rights of millions of people suffering the compounded economic and social impacts of the pandemic.

A Human Rights Watch analysis of public-use microdata from the Census Bureau Household Pulse Survey shows that the pandemic’s economic fallout has had a devastating and disproportionate impact on the rights of low-income people who were already struggling.

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