How lockdown is leading to endemic levels of ‘brain fog’

Policies, Society

How lockdown is leading to endemic levels of ‘brain fog’

Our brains come alive in the presence of others. Incarceration is having a negative impact on our grey matter.

London-based psychoanalyst Josh Cohen, author of the self-help book How to Live, What to Do, notes how where once patients came into his consulting room to lie down on the couch and chat about the weather, the weirdos on the tube, the traffic or the variegated politics of office life, they now appear on his computer screen and tell him, most prevalently, about the dreaded descent of brain fog on their once lucid, razor-sharp minds. That hazy, sluggish feeling of not being able to remember events with precision and in technicolour detail is becoming recurrent, cognition slowed under lockdown to levels of much retarded velocity than we were used to pre-Covid when being busy interacting in real time and physical space with others kept our grey matter functioning at optimum levels.

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The Blocked Suez Canal Isn’t the Only Waterway the World Should Be Worried About

Economy, Policies

The Blocked Suez Canal Isn’t the Only Waterway the World Should Be Worried About

I’ve sailed through the Suez Canal many times—as a junior officer, a captain of a destroyer, a commodore in command of a group of destroyers, and as a strike group commander on the nuclear aircraft carrier Enterprise. It is a fascinating trip, and dangerous in a variety of ways. At various times, the terrorist threat was very high and we went through with crew-served weapons manned fore and aft, and helicopters over head.

Exhaustion for the senior leaders tends to be a factor as it is a long passage. As a ship’s captain, I almost went aground in the Great Bitter Lake, as the Suez is called, after a couple of bad navigational decisions on my part, but, fortunately, my navigator saved my career with some good advice.

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Shopping for Bombs: Nuclear Proliferation, Global Insecurity, and the Rise and Fall of the A.Q. Khan Network

Proflieration, Threats

Shopping for Bombs: Nuclear Proliferation, Global Insecurity, and the Rise and Fall of the A.Q. Khan Network

A.Q. Khan was the world’s leading black market dealer in nuclear technology, described by a former CIA Director as “at least as dangerous as Osama bin Laden.” A hero in Pakistan and revered as the Father of the Bomb, Khan built a global clandestine network that sold the most closely guarded nuclear secrets to Iran, North Korea, and Libya.

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While Europe Slept: How Radical Islam is Destroying the West from Within

Immigration, Policies

While Europe Slept: How Radical Islam is Destroying the West from Within

The struggle for the soul of Europe today is every bit as dire and consequential as it was in the 1930s. Then, in Weimar, Germany, the center did not hold, and the light of civilization nearly went out. Today, the continent has entered yet another “Weimar moment.” Will Europeans rise to the challenge posed by radical Islam, or will they cave in once again to the extremists?

As an American living in Europe since 1998, Bruce Bawer has seen this problem up close. Across the continent—in Amsterdam, Oslo, Copenhagen, Paris, Berlin, Madrid, and Stockholm—he encountered large, rapidly expanding Muslim enclaves in which women were oppressed and abused, homosexuals persecuted and killed, “infidels” threatened and vilified, Jews demonized and attacked, barbaric traditions (such as honor killing and forced marriage) widely practiced, and freedom of speech and religion firmly repudiated.

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All Is Clouded by Desire: Global Banking, Money Laundering, and International Organized Crime (International and Comparative Criminology)

Threats, Transnational Crime

All Is Clouded by Desire: Global Banking, Money Laundering, and International Organized Crime (International and Comparative Criminology)

Before Enron, before Arthur Anderson, and before Worldcom, there was the Bank of New York money laundering scandal, which hit headlines in 1999. Promising to be one of the most important books on international organized crime, money laundering, and the complicity between legitimate and illegitimate businesses in both the United States and the former Soviet Union, among other places, during the last decade of the 20th century, All Is Clouded by Desire examines the criminal dealings that led to the revelation that the Bank of New York’s Eastern European Division laundered $6 billion for Russian organized criminals and other shady organizations and individuals.

In a series of intrigues that involved crooked Geneva banker Bruce Rappaport and high-level members of the Bank of New York, criminal Russian organizations were able to thrive and prosper during a time when the rest of the former Soviet Union crumbled amidst growing corruption and a declining economy.

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