A sweeping study shows how humans changed the environment over 12,000 years

Ecology, Threats

A sweeping study shows how humans changed the environment over 12,000 years

One environmental narrative, common to dystopian science fiction, goes like this: humans start to colonize the planet, and slowly take up more and more space until there’s nothing wild or untouched on Earth. Humanity’s infectious spread over the globe slowly eats the planet’s resources alive.

As it turns out, this narrative is all wrong — at least for the past 12,000 years, according to a new study. Humans, researchers found, occupy roughly the same amount of land on Earth that they always have in that span. That means that our planet’s myriad environmental problems aren’t exactly the cause of human societies spreading, but rather the way that we misuse resources that exist. Evidently, humans roamed about the same places they always had on Earth without stirring up too much trouble, at least until the advent of industrial capitalist societies.

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Millions Spend Easter Weekend Under COVID-19 Lockdowns

Policies, Society

Millions Spend Easter Weekend Under COVID-19 Lockdowns

India’s health ministry said Sunday that it recorded 93,249 new COVID cases in the previous 24-hour period, the highest daily tally this year in the South Asian nation.

Only two other nations have more coronavirus infections than India’s 12.4 million cases, according to Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center. The U.S has 30.6 million cases, while Brazil has 12.9 million. Millions of people worldwide are under new lockdown restrictions this Easter weekend thanks to coronavirus infections that have surged despite the continued rollout of vaccination campaigns.

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Do privileged US citizens have better health outcomes?

Health, Policies

Do privileged US citizens have better health outcomes?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, privilege—or the lack thereof—and its effects on health have taken on considerable importance.

Privilege can manifest in disparities related to wealth, race, gender, and more. In the pandemic, for instance, the wealth gap between Black and White Americans remained strong, as White families held 84% of total household wealth in the United States. Analysts for the Brookings Institution claim that this gap placed Black families in a less desirable position when COVID-19 struck.

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