How to protect healthcare workers – and improve pandemic preparedness

Health, Policies

How to protect healthcare workers – and improve pandemic preparedness

Worldwide, the COVID-19 pandemic underscored the structural vulnerabilities and lack of pandemic preparedness in our health systems.These vulnerabilities were further impacted by a shortage of healthcare workers.

The pandemic brought an unprecedented demand for healthcare capacity in clinics, hospitals, intensive care units and home-care. Healthcare workers were providing care at significantly longer hours in overwhelmed facilities, frequently with insufficient skills and training combined with a lack of protective equipment. With facilities understaffed, many workers were double-shifting as caregivers and providing clinical training to volunteers.

Gas Pipelines: Harming Clean Water, People, and the Planet

Ecology, Threats, Water

Gas Pipelines: Harming Clean Water, People, and the Planet

Oil and gas pipelines crisscross the United States, and new ones are still being built. It would take volumes to document all the dangers they pose to people, nature, and the planet, but here’s a start: greenhouse gas emissions, violations of indigenous treaty rights and sovereignty, destruction of endangered species habitat, taking of private property without public benefit, contamination of drinking water sources and streams and rivers, ruination of farms and landscapes, deaths and injuries from explosions, damage to wild ecosystems, and environmental injustice.

The International Energy Agency has called for an immediate end to new investments in fossil fuel pipelines. With all the cleaner alternatives available, the only benefit of new pipelines is to increase the corporate profits of pipeline owners. Yet while the potential for harm is well known, government agencies keep rubber-stamping permits.

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The controversial future of nuclear power in the U.S.

Energy, Policies

The controversial future of nuclear power in the U.S.

As the climate crisis worsens, the discussion intensifies over what role nuclear power should play in fighting it.

The Money Plot: A History of Currency’s Power to Enchant, Control, and Manipulate

Economy, Policies

The Money Plot: A History of Currency’s Power to Enchant, Control, and Manipulate

Money obeys the rules of math, but math does not rule money. When it comes to creating and sustaining faith in a currency, the principles of narrative reign supreme. Like great characters, great currencies develop. The dollar faltered for more than 100 years after its founding. It teetered into the 20th century, then much like an adolescent on the verge of adulthood, matured and regressed in equal measure until, by the middle of the same century, it was ready to rescue the franc, the lira, the mark, the pound and the yen.

Heroes often discard logic and reason in favor of fury and passion; likewise, the impulses that motivated the greatest character ever invented. Molded from farmland, flesh, fish, forests, sugar and slaves, the dollar was and always would be synonymous with the American spirit. It epitomized the vision of Alexander Hamilton, Andrew Jackson, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan. Nothing would surpass it.

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America’s year of hunger: how children and people of color suffered most

Poverty, Threats

America’s year of hunger: how children and people of color suffered most

Investigation of a year’s worth of data reveals the scale of America’s hunger and food insecurity crisis during a year of Covid-19

Black families in the US have gone hungry at two to three times the rate of white families over the course of the pandemic, according to new analysis which suggests political squabbling over Covid aid exacerbated a crisis that left millions of children without enough to eat.

An investigation into food poverty by the Guardian and the Institute for Policy Research (IPR) at Northwestern University found gaping racial inequalities in access to adequate nutrition that threatens the long-term prospects of a generation of Black and brown children.

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Fighting in Disguise: The unspoken female soldiers of Gettysburg

Civil War, Threats

Fighting in Disguise: The unspoken female soldiers of Gettysburg

We don’t often talk about girl power when discussing the Civil War. This is because military accomplishments are typically dominated by men — in the past and the present. So, as history continues to overshadow women’s contributions, it’s not surprising that most people aren’t aware of the numerous female soldiers who fought in the Battle of Gettysburg — and in the Civil War as a whole.

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Lessons Learned From a Year of Closed Schools

Education, Policies

Lessons Learned From a Year of Closed Schools

An outbreak at a senior home, which would ultimately be linked to at least 37 deaths, had already shuttered three schools in the 24,000-student district for deep cleaning, the central office was inundated with calls and emails from frantic parents and school staff reporting potential new exposures and more than 20% of students had stopped coming in at all.

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5 Examples of How Healthcare Data Analytics Can Save Lives

Health, Policies

5 Examples of How Healthcare Data Analytics Can Save Lives

William Bruce Cameron once famously wrote, “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.” And in today’s data-centric business landscape, maxims like this can be necessary reminders that it’s not the data that really matters, it’s what we do with it. But the parallel between what counts and what can be counted can sometimes converge – especially when it comes to healthcare data analysis. So here are five cases where healthcare data insight has led to meaningful action.

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The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, & Power

State War, Threats

The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, & Power

The Prize recounts the panoramic history of oil — and the struggle for wealth power that has always surrounded oil. This struggle has shaken the world economy, dictated the outcome of wars, and transformed the destiny of men and nations. The Prize is as much a history of the twentieth century as of the oil industry itself. The canvas of this history is enormous — from the drilling of the first well in Pennsylvania through two great world wars to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and Operation Desert Storm.

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