How to protect healthcare workers – and improve pandemic preparedness

Health, Policies

How to protect healthcare workers – and improve pandemic preparedness

Worldwide, the COVID-19 pandemic underscored the structural vulnerabilities and lack of pandemic preparedness in our health systems.These vulnerabilities were further impacted by a shortage of healthcare workers.

The pandemic brought an unprecedented demand for healthcare capacity in clinics, hospitals, intensive care units and home-care. Healthcare workers were providing care at significantly longer hours in overwhelmed facilities, frequently with insufficient skills and training combined with a lack of protective equipment. With facilities understaffed, many workers were double-shifting as caregivers and providing clinical training to volunteers.

Promises I Can Keep: Why Poor Women Put Motherhood Before Marriage

Poverty, Threats

Promises I Can Keep: Why Poor Women Put Motherhood Before Marriage

Millie Acevedo bore her first child before the age of 16 and dropped out of high school to care for her newborn. Now 27, she is the unmarried mother of three and is raising her kids in one of Philadelphia’s poorest neighborhoods.

Would she and her children be better off if she had waited to have them and had married their father first? Why do so many poor American youth like Millie continue to have children before they can afford to take care of them?

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Blackout: How the Electric Industry Exploits America

Energy, Policies

Blackout: How the Electric Industry Exploits America

In the midst of the sweltering summer of August 2003, the lights went out across northeast America. From Canada to Philadelphia, houses were plunged into darkness, elevators stalled, subway cars ceased to run, air-conditioners shuddered into silence, and the candle-lit 1890s streets of Brooklyn became a reality once more. Astonishingly, no company or individual has ever been held accountable for what cost affected regions millions of dollars in lost revenue and compensation. The electricity companies involved introduced no new rules, nor a single firing — nothing. As Gordon Weil explores in Blackout, this was the culmination of a long history of exploitation by the electric industry of its customers, coupled with the seeming indifference and incompetence of the regulators who were supposed to protect them.

Weil describes the founding of the original electric monopoly by Edison and his secretary, Insull, and reveals how and why Roosevelt’s efforts to control the company’s excesses failed. Weil continues with the willful failure of the industry to integrate itself into the competitive marketplace; a failure in which the customer remains the biggest loser. Weil concludes that unless the government and the regulators undertake radical legislation, “lights out” remains a distinct possibility for us all.

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A Brilliant Solution: Inventing the American Constitution

State War, Threats

A Brilliant Solution: Inventing the American Constitution

Though the American Revolution is widely recognized as our nation’s founding story, the years immediately following the war—when our government was a disaster and the country was in a terrible crisis—were in fact the most crucial in establishing the country’s independence. The group of men who traveled to Philadelphia in the summer of 1787 had no idea what kind of history their meeting would make.

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