Capital and the Ecology of Disease

Ecology, Threats

Capital and the Ecology of Disease

“The old Greek philosophers,” Frederick Engels wrote in Socialism: Utopian and Scientific, “were all born natural dialecticians.”1 Nowhere was this more apparent than in ancient Greek medical thought, which was distinguished by its strong materialist and ecological basis. This dialectical, materialist, and ecological approach to epidemiology (from the ancient Greek epi, meaning on or upon, and demos, the people) was exemplified by the classic Hippocratic text Airs Waters Places (c. 400 BCE), which commenced:

Whoever wishes to investigate medicine properly, should proceed thus: in the first place to consider the seasons of the year, and what effects each of them produces, for they are not all alike, but differ from themselves in regard to their changes.

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Listen: Tigar on “Sensing Injustice” and almost every case imaginable (“Law and Disorder”)

Justice, Policies

Listen: Tigar on “Sensing Injustice” and almost every case imaginable (“Law and Disorder”)

If you want to hear more of the details and stories around the trials of the Chicago 8, Julian Assange, Lynne Stewart, Pinochet, and dozens more dramatic court cases with direct impacts on each of our daily lives, then it will be well worth your while to give your ear to Law and Disorder‘s most recent conversation with Michael Tigar.

Still, in his book Sensing Injustice, Tigar goes well beyond merely, if magnificently, narrating a profound array of legal battles. Tigar well understands the limits of law, and the lawyer, in the fight for justice — as do his fellow lawyers Heidi Boghosian and Michael Smith —and challenging existential questions about the nature of the legal profession also come up in the Law and Disorder interview

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Article: Out of the Pandemic, Chances for Another Future

Policies, Society

Out of the Pandemic, Chances for Another Future

About a year ago, just as the pandemic was hitting New York City, St. John Frizell and his two partners were readying for the grand reopening of Gage & Tollner, a newly renovated, 140-year-old restaurant in Downtown Brooklyn. One day before the March 15 opening — for which the three partners had spent almost a year and a half preparing — they made the difficult decision not to open.

Mr. Frizell retreated to his home in Brooklyn. “The only sounds in the street were ice cream trucks and ambulances,” he recalled. Anxious about going to the supermarket but needing groceries for himself and his son, he reached out to one of his vendors, Lancaster Farm Fresh Co-op, to see about having some food delivered. Lancaster was delivering boxes of seasonal produce, but needed an order large enough to be worth the trip. So Mr. Frizell, who suddenly had downtime, did something he hadn’t done in a while: He reached out to his neighbors.

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Farmers face complex political, economic landscape in 2021

Agriculture, Policies

Farmers face complex political, economic landscape in 2021

Farmers face a complex landscape for 2021, above and beyond the usual variables that affect them — such as, quite recently, drought and windy weather that is stirring up dust and a potentially harsh spring here in the MonDak.

Not only is America still struggling with economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic — which is itself threatening to resurge on the strength of COVID-19 variants amid slower-than-hoped vaccinations — but there is a new sheriff on board, with very different priorities than the previous federal administration, and that shift in focus includes agriculture.

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A Billion Bootstraps: Microcredit, Barefoot Banking, and The Business Solution for Ending Poverty

Poverty, Threats

A Billion Bootstraps: Microcredit, Barefoot Banking, and The Business Solution for Ending Poverty

A bold manifesto by two business leaders, A Billion Bootstraps shows why microcredit is the world’s most powerful poverty-fighting movement-and an unbeatable investment for your charitable donations.

A Billion Bootstraps unearths the roots of the microcredit revolution, revealing how the pioneering work of people such as Dr. Muhammad Yunus-winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize-is giving hope to billions. Philanthropist and self-made millionaire Phil Smith and microcredit expert and consultant Eric Thurman provide a riveting narrative that explores how these small loans, arranged by “barefoot bankers,” enable impoverished people to start small businesses, support their families, and improve local economies.

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The Utility of Force: The Art of War in the Modern World

State War, Threats

The Utility of Force: The Art of War in the Modern World

“War no longer exists,” writes General Sir Rupert Smith, powerfully reminding us that the clash of mass national armies—the system of war since Napoleon—will never occur again. Instead, he argues in this timely book, we must be prepared to adapt tactics to each conflict, or lose the ability to protect ourselves and our way of life.

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Deterring America: Rogue States and the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction

Proflieration, Threats

Deterring America: Rogue States and the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction

Faced with America’s military superiority, many countries are turning to weapons of mass destruction (WMD) as a means to deter United States intervention. However, the events of September 11 awakened America to a degree of vulnerability it had never experienced before, making it increasingly unwilling to tolerate such weapons in the hands of unstable and unpredictable regimes.

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Tactics of the Crescent Moon: Militant Muslim Combat Methods

State War, Threats

Tactics of the Crescent Moon: Militant Muslim Combat Methods

This book focuses on how Iran and its various proxies fight.

It is on the most prestigious pre-deployment reading lists for both the U.S. Army and the U.S. Marine Corps, because it fully details the Islamists’ yet-to-be-defeated 4GW method. That method is best countered by “truly light” infantry tactics, but America has had only “line” infantry since 1943. Its members travel mostly by truck and fight mostly with supporting arms. That’s because the Pentagon is still practicing a “higher-tech” version of 2GW (killing as many enemy as possible)

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