Protest and Possibilities: Civil Society and Coalitions for Political Change in Malaysia (Contemporary Issues in Asia and Pacific)

Demographic, Wild Cards

Protest and Possibilities: Civil Society and Coalitions for Political Change in Malaysia (Contemporary Issues in Asia and Pacific)

Protest and Possibilities explores the pursuit of political reform in Malaysia, an illiberal democracy, and contrasts coalition-building and reform processes there with those of electoral authoritarian Indonesia. The study considers the roles of civil society agents (CSAs) in promoting alternative (especially noncommunal) political norms and helping to find common ground among opposition political actors, and compares recent reformist initiatives with past political trajectories.

The nature of illiberal democracy encourages a combination of contained and transgressive contention, with CSAs and political parties performing distinct but complementary roles. Enough space has been allowed over time for CSAs and political parties to accumulate coalitional capital, or the mutual trust and understanding necessary for groups to find common cause and work in coalition. In addition, shifts in political opportunities and threats encourage both CSAs and political parties to alter their strategies and thinking to take advantage of windows for change, facilitating long-term normative as well as institutional change.

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The Legality of Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons: A Guide to the Historic Opinion of the International Court of Justice Foreword by Phon van den … Arms) (Recht und Zukunftsverantwortung)

Proflieration, Threats

The Legality of Threat or Use of Nuclear Weapons: A Guide to the Historic Opinion of the International Court of Justice Foreword by Phon van den … Arms) (Recht und Zukunftsverantwortung)

The threat or use of nuclear weapons would generally be contrary to the rules of international law applicable in armed conflict, and in particular the principles and rules of humanitarian law … There exists an obligation to pursue in good faith and bring to a conclusion negotiations leading to nuclear disarmament in all its aspects under strict and effective international control.”” –

Advisory Opinion of the International Court of Justice, 8 July 1996 “”This book shows how courageous states from the developing world, working in concert with visionary lawyers, physicians and other sectors of international civil society, boldly obtained astonishing results from the highest court in the world. The World Court clearly ruled that the threat or use of nuclear weapons is illegal in almost all conceivable circumstances. The Court further underlined the unconditional obligation of the nuclear weapon states to begin and conclude negotiations on nuclear disarmament in all its aspects. It is now up to all of us to determine the follow-up, whatever the opposition.

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