How history teaches diseases change world power

Disease, Threats

How history teaches diseases change world power

The development of modern technology can easily lead to misperceptions that infectious diseases can be effectively controlled in developed nations. For example, the last naturally occurring case of variole was diagnosed in October 1977, and the World Health Organization (WHO) certified the global eradication of the disease in 1980.

In 1978, the UN members signed the Alma-Ata Declaration which predicated, “an acceptable level of health for all the people of the world by the year 2000 can be attained.” This focus of disease prevention began to shift to diseases associated with higher life expectancy and with lower mortality, ranging from diabetes mellitus to heart disease to cancer, to name a few.

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America’s year of hunger: how children and people of color suffered most

Poverty, Threats

America’s year of hunger: how children and people of color suffered most

Investigation of a year’s worth of data reveals the scale of America’s hunger and food insecurity crisis during a year of Covid-19

Black families in the US have gone hungry at two to three times the rate of white families over the course of the pandemic, according to new analysis which suggests political squabbling over Covid aid exacerbated a crisis that left millions of children without enough to eat.

An investigation into food poverty by the Guardian and the Institute for Policy Research (IPR) at Northwestern University found gaping racial inequalities in access to adequate nutrition that threatens the long-term prospects of a generation of Black and brown children.

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